Grant observed the same game plan 20 years ago. "During the 1980s when Planned Parenthood shifted its focus from community-based clinics to school-based clinics, it again targeted inner-city minority neighborhoods," he writes. "Of the more than 100 school-based clinics that have opened nationwide in the last decade [1980s], none has been at substantially all-white schools," he adds. "None has been at suburban middle-class schools. All have been at black, minority or ethnic schools."

In 1987, a group of black ministers, parents and educators filed suit against the Chicago Board of Education. They charged the city’s school-based clinics with not only violating the state’s fornication laws, but also with discrimination against blacks. The clinics were a "calculated, pernicious effort to destroy the very fabric of family life [between] black parents and their children," the suit alleged.

One of the parents in the group was "shocked" when her daughter came home from school with Planned Parenthood material. "I never realized how racist those people were until I read the [information my daughter received] at the school clinic," she said. "[They are worse than] the Klan … because they’re so slick and sophisticated. Their bigotry is all dolled up with statistics and surveys, but just beneath the surface it’s as ugly as apartheid."

A more recent account uncovered a Planned Parenthood affiliate giving condoms to residents of a poor black neighborhood in Akron, Ohio. The residents received a "promotional bag" containing, among other things: literature on sexually transmitted disease prevention, gynecology exams and contraception, a condom-case key chain containing a bright-green condom, and a coupon. The coupon was redeemable at three Ohio county clinics for a dozen condoms and a $5 McDonald’s gift certificate. All the items were printed with Planned Parenthood phone numbers.

The affiliate might say they’re targeting high-pregnancy areas, but their response presumes destructive behavior on the part of the targeted group. Planned Parenthood has always been reluctant to promote, or encourage, abstinence as the only safeguard against teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, calling it "unrealistic."

Rev. Richard Welch, president of Human Life International in Front Royal, Virginia, "blasted" the affiliate for targeting low-income, minority neighborhoods with the bags. He said the incident revealed "the racism inherent in promoting abortion and contraception in primarily minority neighborhoods."

He then criticized Planned Parenthood: "Having sprung from the racist dreams of a woman determined to apply abortion and contraception to eugenics and ethnic cleansing, Planned Parenthood remains true to the same strategy today."

Untangling the Deceptive Web

Black leaders have been silent about Margaret Sanger’s evil machination against their community far too long. They’ve been silent about abortion’s devastating effects in their community–despite their pro-life inclination. "The majority of [blacks] are more pro-life than anything else," said Hunter. "Blacks were never taught to destroy their children; even in slavery they tried to hold onto their children."

"Blacks are not quiet about the issue because they do no care, but rather because the truth has been kept from them. The issue is … to educate our people, " said former Planned Parenthood board member LaVerne Tolbert.

Today, a growing number of black pro-lifers are untangling the deceptive web spun by Sanger. They are using truth to shed light on the lies. The "Say SO" march is just one example of their burgeoning pro-life activism. As the marchers laid 1,452 roses at the courthouse steps–to commemorate the number of black babies aborted daily–spokesman Damon Owens said, "This calls national attention to the problem [of abortion]. This is an opportunity for blacks to speak to other blacks. This doesn’t solve all of our problems. But we will not solve our other problems with abortion."

Black pro-lifers are also linking arms with their white pro-life brethren. Black Americans for Life (BAL) is an outreach group of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC), a Washington, D.C. based grassroots organizations. NRLC encourages networking between black and white pro-lifers. "Our goal is to bring people together–from all races, colors, and religions–to work on pro-life issues," said NRLC Director of Outreach Ernest Ohlhoff. "Black Americans for Life in not a parallel group; we want to help African-Americans integrate communicational and functionally into the pro-life movement."

Mrs. Beverly LaHaye, founder and chairman of Concerned Women for America, echoes the sentiment. "Our mission is to protect the right to life of all members of the human race. CWA welcomes like-minded women and men, from all walks of life, to join us in this fight."

Concerned Women for America has a long history of fighting Planned Parenthood’s evil agenda. The Negro Project is an obscure angle, but one that must come to light. Margaret Sanger sold black Americans an illusion. Now with the veil of deception removed, they can "choose life … that [their] descendants may live."
 

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